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 Chris Somerville


Chris Somerville

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Chris Somerville was born in Launceston, Tasmania in 1984 and now lives in Queensland. In 2003 he won the State Library of Queensland Young Writers Awards and in 2009 he was shortlisted for the Queensland Premiers Literary Awards, Emerging Author category. His short fiction has appeared in numerous literary journals, including Voiceworks, The Lifted Brow, Paper Radio, Islet and Stilts. He has taught in the creative writing programs at both Griffith University and the University of Queensland.
ALL TITLES BY CHRIS SOMERVILLE
We Are Not The Same Anymore
We Are Not The Sam...
Chris Somerville


Suffused with dark humour, Chris Somerville's short stories reveal the struggle for intimacy with a deft and affectionate touch.


AWARDS
Shortlisted: 2013 Queensland Literary Awards – Australian Short Story Collection, Steele Rudd Award
IN THE MEDIA
‘When I first read Chris’s work many years ago, I knew I was reading a very talented writer. His work is emotionally true, real and full of depth. He writes with a unique rhythm and voice that captures the essence of the story so well. I learn so much from his writing, both as a writer and as a reader’ – Favel Parrett, author of Past the Shallows

‘Chris Somerville is armed with the finest radar, picking up on all the loaded silences between people no one else detects, somehow knowing exactly what they all mean. These are such damn fine stories: surprising, deft and always revealing’ – Benjamin Law, author of Family Law and Gaysia

‘Chris Somerville has a unique voice, intelligent, quiet and yet very funny. These stories of emotional disconnection, familial ties and the melancholy bonds of marriage have, above all, a fundamental sense of truth. To read a Somerville story is to begin to understand something real and important about human relationships’ – Krissy Kneen, bookseller and novelist

‘The stories in We Are Not the Same Any More are at once funny and achingly sad in their exploration of the minutae of daily life’ Kristina Olsson, author of The China Garden

‘Stories that chart the landscape of love and loss with a biting and very black sense of humour. Like dreams, they refuse to provide any consolation, insisting instead on deepening the mystery of how we come together and come apart.’ Cory Taylor, author of Me and Mr Booker